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of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
, there seem to be two approaches to foreign policy in the twenty-first century. one of the neo conservatives which have great power in this administration. check name names which i will not do. >> i do in this book. >> the new conservative ideological approach to foreign policy seems to be prevalent now as opposed to the traditional national interest pragmatic approach or is there some other approach? what do you see in the twenty-first century? >> i see a policy regardless who the president is of clear national interest and a policy must be for any nation whether it is the russians or the chinese, all nations, all individuals respond in their own self-interest, nothing wrong with that. that is predictable. the policy of our country, foreign policy, all the instruments of power it that you use to frame a policy must be driven with some higher purpose. i mentioned purpose, we lost purpose. we have been about ricocheting crisis to crisis. there's no strategic thinking, hasn't been strategic thinking for a long time in our foreign policy. it is the point i keep making. so does dick lugar who is
on this complex issue. robert kagn is a center fellow of the united states and european foreign policy of the brookings institution. his most recent book "the world america made" has been published and dr. kagan also serves as a member of secretary clinton's foreign policy board soon to be senator kerry's policy board and writes a monthly column on a world affairs from "the washington post" and the weekly standard and the new republic. joshua landis is the director of the center for middle east studies and this is the professor at the university of oklahoma. he writes a daily newsletter on syrian policy that attract some 200,000 pages a month. is really one of the most thoughtful blogs today on a which really dives into the crisis and syria. current the vice president for the new initiatives and the distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson institute at national center for scholars in washington, d.c. they can have another great president. for nearly to nearly two decades has served the secretaries of state and advisers in the middle east bureau, negotiating middle east peace which w
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
and criticism over his foreign policy stance thursday during his senate confirmation hearing. he has seen opposition from within his own republican party for failing to adequately back the party line on israel and iran. hegel was attacked during the hearing for earlier comments that were perceived as critical of israel. this is south carolina senator lindsey graham. >> you said the jewish lobby intimidates a lot of people. senator.itand israelis i cannot think of a more provocative thing to say about the relationship between the united states and israel and the senate or congress and which you said. do you agree with me you should not have said something like that? >> yes, i've already said that. >> he also faced a grilling from longtime friend and senate colleague arizona senator john mccain over his views on iraq war. >> were you correct or incorrect when he said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> by reference to -- >> the question is, were you right or wrong? that is pretty straightforward. >>
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
to be devoted to? but -- what is this 15 minutes going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think -- you really don't need to in today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propos
the president in the countries foreign policy debates -- mr. kerry in the state department, mr. hagel at the pentagon, and mr. mccain, will all derive a substantial part of their legitimacy from vietnam experiences. mr. mccain's relationship with mr. kerr it isy the striking tale of the lingering influence of the vietnam. more than a decade later, mccain traveled to massachusetts to campaign against mr. kerry. yet the pair worked so closely in the cause of reviving relations with vietnam that they became friends. when mr. kerry appeared at a senate confirmation hearing last week, he was introduced by mr. mccain, who praised his ' exemplary statesmanship.' mr. mccain's relationship with mr. hagel what has gone the opposite way. 'i admire him and consider is friendship to be a treasure of inestimable value to me,' mr. mccain said in 2001. by the time mr. mccain became the presidential candidate and to designate, the relationship had cooled. mr. hagel refused to endorse 'm, telling 'the new yorker' we so fundamentally disagree on our future course of our foreign policy and our role in th
going to get in a bunch of foreign policy issues or find out what people wanted to know about. i think people want to know more about this than syria. >> eric: i wasn't suggesting syria was the question. maybe benghazi but softballs. >> greg: steve croft summed up why "60 minutes" is 59 minutes too long. we have seen harder hitting journallism on back of cream boxes. the only way the lovefest could have been fakeer is if they went skeet shooker. >> eric: more fake. >> greg: faker? thank you. >> dana: "60 minutes" is known to point out hypocrisy and inconsistency. there is plenty to choose from, from the testimony on benghazi alone. i think if they called me up and said we want you to do an interview with president and mrs. clinton, offer it to you exclusively and give you 30 minutes. i can't do my job in 30 minutes. i'll take a pass. why didn't they do that? >> eric: last word. >> bob: i suppose they could have done that. i believe people want to know. the first time you see them together. questions. they ran against each other in heat of the battle and became two of the most opposite
of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of s
the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's for secretary of state, immediately afterwards i'm told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did our research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in her current incarnation as secretary of state. and his afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on entangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much as been made of the mile she has put in as the country 67 secretary of state. you have seen a sta
correct or incorrect when you said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam, are you correct or incorrect? >> my referents reference to the -- the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straight forward question. i would like to answer whether you are right or wrong then you are free to elaborate? >> i am not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> let the record show you refused to answer the question. >> we know now the surge did in fact work. peter doocy live in washington covering all of the events today. >> what we saw yesterday was the equivalent of a job interview. instead of being questioned by one human resources employee about things on an application chuck hagel was quizzed by the entire senate armed services committee about everything he has ever said. senior obama administration official told us chuck hagel's testimony was not perfect he had a long day as he tried to explain away past public positions about important issues like iran and israel. >> give me an example where we have been intimidated the
of the president's state of the union address and how foreign and defense policy will be handled. then senator kirsten gillibrand discusses bipartisan safety legislation. later, former representative gabrielle giffords on gun violence. >> on thursday, a hearing on u.s. workers and retirement savings. live coverage from the senate health education and labor and pynchon's committee. that is live thursday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, pretty good. what we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? and once we have to assert it all of this time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. and we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> randall robinson, taking your calls, e-mail, facebook comments, and tweets. sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> president obama is set to deliver the state of the union. a discussion on how foreign policy and national security i
. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, our, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. [laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism,
and bad thing when you are talking about foreign policy. >> thank you for your thoughts today. moving to another story. maybe you saw the videotape, a terrible snow mobiling crash at the espn "x" games in colorado. a high-profile crash from the last few days. that seems to be raising questions about the safety of both the riders and the fans. so you can see the guy speeding over a ramp. but he goes airborne and flips right over the handle bars and crash someone crashes on top of him and those things are heavy, sometimes 500 pounds. rescuers raced to him he feel walked off the slope. but by the time emergency workers got him to the hospital, doctors realized he was in far worse shape than he appeared. jonathan hunt is here. tell me what happened to him? >> reporter: well, this is the kind of trick that he has performed many times before in practice and in competition. but frankly, this time, he simply got it wrong. take a look in slow motion. he's trying to do a back flip here. but he gets the landing wrong, coming up short. the skis dig into the slope there, he goes over the front and
dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect. >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> let it show you refused to answer the equipment he did answer standing bit word on the iraq war in revealing something about the kind of defense secretary he hopes to be. >> i saw the consequences and suffering and the horror of war so i did question a surge. is this going to be worth the sacrifice. we lost almost 1200 dead americans during that surge. now was it required? was it necessary? >>reporter: hagel the first defense secretary to w.h.o. saw some about the as enlisted soldier. poor kid from nebraskaed he and his brother tom volunteered to serve in vietnam. brother served in the same infantry unit in 1968. both getting wounded. each credit the other with saving their lives. >> i don't see the limb of every world event and whether we should use american power through the lens of vietnam. but it is part of me. >>reporter: hagel service praised. >> i admire your service to your country. >>reporter: but criticized soft on iran
to $100 trillion and that is a stunning number. we had a dysfunctional foreign policy, we had this problem of the baby boom generation. and we have a 12 from kindergarten education system. it is not too late. we have about that kind of timeframe in order to start moving. if we don't move soon, it becomes almost impossible to fix this without upheaval. i happen to actually be fairly optimistic. i do think two things. i think the american sense of life, americans fundamentally don't like big government. when times seem to be moving the wrong direction, sometimes we are surprised. i think this is a nice caviar. the biggest thing that we have going for us is that we have the best ideas. the bad news is that things have railed over and over again. people tell me how surprised they were when the soviet union failed. but communism always fails. it did not surprise me at all. the question is when it does, will we be there with the right ideas to move the country in the right direction. even though i think we will win because we have the right ideas. in regards to individual objects, i think we had
is very good in foreign policy and i think she will be -- i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff in tupelo, mississippi. republican line. caller: good morning. how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: she got sworn in, she looked good in the pictures, she flew around the world a little bit, and nothing that she has accomplished. i don't think our allies are real pleased with. our enemies in the past belief in the best predictor of -- i mean, future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that the real bad people in this world understand is force. i don't think talking to them and making nice-nice with them is going to do anything except emboldened them. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception? could you expand on that? caller: well, the lead from behind strategy of this administration got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. as far as her taking responsibility for that, what responsibility is it that she has actually taken? none she actually said to the american people what difference does it make now for that
problems. governance is bad and south america, for example, that's where foreign policy comes in to it. we have to work with governments to make things better in their own countries and an investment of soft power looking at sequestration and look at when's important. border, working with allies to stop certain terrorist acts and using soft influence to make things better for folks in latin america. >> colonel, ronald reagan promised border security and i think a lot of republicans feel a little disillusioned about that. and when you talk about our allies -- >> right. >> -- obvious to the south, mexico, on the board and brian terry, what are the kinds of things we should be asking of mexico? what are the kinds of solutions we should be looking to mexico to bring to the table to solve a mutual problem? >> glad you brought that up. my next book, it comes out in june, we talk about regarding criminal and terrorist activity and what should be done by the friendly governments. frankly, they have to do more to help their people want to stay in mexico and the other countries further down and a hu
foreign policy since vietnam? >> is that correct or incorrect? >> are you going to answer the question? he has supported questionable respect for israel. he is expected to have confirmation and become the first enlisted man to serve as defense secretary. >> it would be a positive message for our armed forces and armed forces are run throug our round the world national polls show that most americans support replacing leon panetta. >> hillary clinton spoke after less function. friday will be her last. she spoke of her -- last auction shes is saying that it is difficult to believe and difficult to leave. >> although it is difficult to predict what day that this will bring to moral my heart will be full. serving with the men and women of the state department has been a singular honor. >> she is issu issuin a warning and she says that she was doing what it is possible to do. there is speculation that issue could run for president. people are just beginning to get an idea of the incredible damage from a huge storm system that blew through parts of the u.s. this is adairsville, georgia.where a to
.s. troop surge in iraq, which you may recall, hagel had called, in his words, the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam, he asked whether that surge had ultimately been successful. >> the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> let the record show that you refuse to answer that question. now, please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> no, i actually would like an answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. >> another hot topic at the hearing today, it was a 2006 interview that hagel gave to former middle east peace negotiator, erin david miller. now, in that interview, hagel said this. "the jewish lobby intimidates a lot of people up here." now, today of that comment about the "jewish lobby," hagel said categorically, i regret it. >> i've already said i regret referencing the jewish lobby. i should have sa
in the constitution's direction on foreign policy. america's future foundation's online magazine double tank of us in professionals the opportunity to find their voice and am pleased to on the editor, georgia turkey. are you around? please network withdrawal if you have an idea. but that's a heavy right for us as well. we also invite you to a number of other networking and professional development events. learn more at america's future.org or follow us on twitter at afs d.c. it is my honor to introduce our panel moderator this evening, maurice sanders. lori is the manager of the richer freedom project at the american presence of gibberish insert for the last three years. in this role she supports adis external affairs and student outreach teams as well as marketing and outreach for arthur brooks latest book, the road to freedom, which i highly recommend if you haven't had a chance to read. she's a member of the america's future foundation planning committee on which he asserts as 2010. the shyness and welcoming, laurie sanders. [applause] >> thanks, roger and welcome to the american enterprise ins
at the national committee on american foreign policy and editor of the bimonthly journal "american foreign-policy interests." he was also on the senior advisory group of the u.s. africa command, since its creation. and was vice president for the position of the study of the middle east and africa. let's hear more from the commander of u.s. africa command at howard university last week. [video clip] >> our mission is to protect america and american interests from threats that may emerge from the continent of africa. we see this manifest itself in somalia with al-shabab. in the maghreb in the sahara, as putting out now in mali with al qaeda in the lands of the islamic maghreb. ansar al din as well. in nigeria, the existence of boko haram. these organizations all focused on undermining the governments of those countries and establishing their own regime of control outside of legitimate government control. i am very concerned about each of those individual entities such as al-shabab and the others, it is increasingly the coordination, the synchronization of efforts of those different organizations th
on israel yesterday. it is a huge foreign-policy issue for the. they happen to be in the middle of an environment that is unsettled and without clear paths forward. it is a core interest of the united states. again, it is a scenario where politicians feel strongly and american voters feel extremely strongly. there were some differences of opinion but got explored yesterday. again, that is part of the point of the hearing process -- of a confirmation progress -- process, getting into areas where people have concerns. host: one of the exchanges about israel, democrat from rhode island. >> interviews and speeches, i have always said i am a supporter of israel. in some cases, i have said a -- i am a strong supporter. i think it is in my book that we have a special relationship with israel. we always have. so i have never voted against israel ever in the 12 years i was in the senate. additional supplemental appropriations, the record is very clear. i might add, as long as we're on the subject, -- senator mel -- nelson may have a clear view of this, there have been a couple of recent
in iraq. >> as to the comment i made about the most dangerous foreign policy decision since vietnam was about not just the surge but the overall war of choice going into iraq. that particular decision that was made on the surge but more to the point our war in iraq, i think was the most fundamentally bad dangerous decision since vietnam. aside from the costs that occurred in this country to blood and treasure, aside from what that did to take our focus off of afghanistan which, in fact, was the original and real focus of the national threat to this country, iraq was not. >> so one member of the committee has already said hagel is the wrong person to be the defense secretary. >> do i respect senator hagel, his record today demonstrates he would be a staunch advocate for the continuation of misguided policies of the president's first term, retreating from america's global leadership role and shrinking the military would not make america safer. on the contrary it would endanger our allies and provide opportunity for nations that do not share our interests to fill a global leadership va
that are underrepresented is part of foreign policy. that is one of the things we see here at georgetown. as i walked up this flight of stairs, i pointed out that the jesuits were notaking it a little too far for having to work hard for knowledge. for those of you to do not know me already, i am coming from catholicism. that notion is of your taking the rigor and the hard work and incorporating values not just into the life in doing that in the policy arina. just like we do that in an academic arena. it allows traditions to come together. especially values of freedom, ule ofy, access to ro law. these are things that fuel us all in the conversation. it is wonderful. the more reports i do with the corporate sector, whether it is financial or manufacturing, whether it is folks to do business and management side, is that old disconnect that people say the corporate sector only cares about the bottom line. at the bottom line is the thing that need to be cared about and gets measured. what we have seen is that companies care about more than just the bottom line. the fact that deloitte is stepping up as someth
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
unrest in egypt and syria and how president obama's new foreign-policy team might approach these and other global hot spots. we will also have the president and co-founder of the migration pulp -- migration policy institute to discuss the 1986 law to control the flow of illegal immigrants in the country as well as provide a pathway to citizenship for those already in the country at the time. then we wrap up the program with the president and co- founder of women's rights rl
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
opponent, now thinks he is wrong, especially about this comment. >> the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it's carried out. >> were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being a dangerous -- >> are you refusing to answer, mr. hagel? >> well, i am not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> so you refuse to answer that question. >> watching this tension, even outright scorn, you'd never know these two men were once the closest of friends and political allies n fact, when mccain ran for president in 2000 ark voter asked who he would want in his cabinet. listen to mccain's answer. >> as far as secretary of defense is concerned, there's a lot of people that could do that. one of them i think is senator chuck hagel could do that kind of job. >> reporter: that's right. the same man mccain lit into 13 years later in a confirmation hearing for the same post in president obama's administration. but they once had a bond even tighter than senate colleagues. a shared experience in vietnam. in fact, they were so c
be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> senator hagel, the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like answer whether you're right or wrong and then you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> well let the record show you refused to answer that question. martha: that was uncomfortable. joined by missouri republican senator roy blunt who was in that hearing yesterday. senator, good morning. welcome, good to have you here today. we were arch watching this on television. what was it like in the room? >> well, my guess is in the room it was, it was a little less tense maybe than it appeared on television but certainly as these hearings go it was a pretty intense hearing. i didn't serve with senator hagel in the senate. he left the senate long before i got here. i served with him when he was in the house and i was in the senate. i like him. i admire his service in vietnam. hi
't usually think of as economic policy. immigration reform. i want to give you a few facts about immigrants and the american economy. first, about a tenth of the population is foreign-born, but more than a quarter of business started had a foreign-born owner. in silicon valley, half of all tech starts had a foreign-born owner. right now, about half of the doctors working in science and technology in america are foreign-born. immigrants are 30% more likely to get new businesses and three times more likely to file patents than their counterparts, on average, they tend to lift the american wages. the case is made by way of analogy. everybody gets, aging economies with low birth rates are in trouble. immigration is essential the importing of new workers, like raising the birth rate. but easier, because the newcomers are able to work immediately. you don't have to teach them to walk or eat with a fork. and in the u.s., they have an unusually amount to gain from the immigration, because when it comes to the global draft, we almost always get the first round picks. we do if we want them, and we ma
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)